ARTIFICIAL INCUBATION CENTER & PARENTAL REARING IN HUMAN ISOLATION

This species has a very low reproduction rate, needing more than 10 years to reach their sexual maturity and each couple rears only one chick every two to three years.

However, in captivity it is possible to increase their reproduction capacity by removing the first seasonal egg and leaving the second one to the care of the parents. The eggs removed, at the zoological institutions which are part of the PCCA, are incubated artificially in the Buenos Aires Ecoparque.
It is worth emphasising that 100% of fertile eggs resulted in born chicks, and that 100% of them were included in release programmes into their natural habit. To do this, all the chicks born within the programme are reared in human isolation by using latex puppets that act as their parents.
After two months, the chicks are introduced to wild individuals, but always in isolation. They will remain in this situation until they have fully completed their juvenile plumage, brownish ochre colour, which they get when they are about six months old.
From this moment they will be ready to be included in release programmes in South America. Up until January 2016, setting a world record, the PCCA has managed to incubate and rear in human isolation 51 Condor chicks. All of which were referred to conservation plans in situ.

Ovoscopy
Once a week the small condor embryo is observed for transparency
Hatching
The condor chick is in the process of egg hatching, which can last a maximum of 3 days
Birth assistance
If chicks can´t born by itself, we must assist the birth
Birth
After 3 days of hard work, the chick finishes the delicate birth process
Newborn
After birth, we do all the essencial controls and the chick rests on the incubator
Breeding with latex puppets
The breeding is carried out in human isolation with latex puppets that represent the parents, through mirrored glass
Feeding
Feeding is also done with latex puppets
Imprinting
Puppet breeding facilitates its recognition with its own species, a key element for its reintegration into wildlife
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Andean Condor Integral Conservation Plan

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